Top Bunion Surgery FAQ’s

Top Bunion Surgery FAQ’s

Some people get bunions and though they are not particularly aesthetically pleasing, for some people they may not be painful. Some people want to be able to do something about bunions because they do not feel attractive and others have painful bunions that they would like to deal with. Many people are unsure as to whether or not they should have surgery to remove bunions and have many questions surrounding the issue.

Is surgery the only way to get rid of a bunion?

Bunions can only be removed through surgery but that does not mean that you need surgery in order to get relief if a bunion is causing discomfort. For some people, an individualized treatment pan based on physical condition and lifestyle may be all that is required to avoid discomfort. For others, they may require surgery to get the relief that they seek.

Am I a good candidate for bunion removal surgery?

If a bunion is in the early stages it is best to seek treatment that is less invasive than surgery. Bunions get worse over time so the earlier it is treated, the better off you are as not everyone is a good candidate for a bunionectomy.

If I do get surgery, will I be able to walk afterwards?

If you have surgery to remove a bunion, you should be able to walk afterward while wearing a protective boot. It is a possibility that you will need crutches and if your bunion was a sever case you may need to stay off the foot for a period of a few days. It used to take 6-8 weeks for recovery but with more modern procedures that time has typically been shortened to 2-3 weeks.

If I have surgery, will my bunion come back?

In order to prevent the return of bunions you will need to make sure you practice proper foot care. You will need to avoid things that may have led to the development of a bunion in the first place. You will want to avoid wearing high-heeled shoes or other improper footwear and you may even be instructed to wear corrective orthotics.

Will I need anesthesia for surgery?

A general anesthesia is not needed but a mild sedation will help keep you calm and immobile. Most bunionectomies are performed with an IV sedation.

Is the recovery period painful?

There is likely to be slight pain but it can be managed with over the counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatories. You may also be prescribed creams that will help to control swelling and pain.

Is shaving down the bone an effective treatment for bunions?

Because you are not realigning the bone when you shave it down, it is not a good permanent solution for people who suffer from bunions. When you simply shave the bone, you are not correcting the core problem. If you shave the bone it is likely that the bunion will return and you will need surgery again. If you opt for permanent bunion correction surgery there will be minimum scarring and a less likely chance that you will have to return for further treatment.

Should children have surgery to correct bunions?

Though bunions can be detected as early as 3 or 4 years of age, surgery will generally not be recommended until a child is 13 or 14 and the growth plate in the foot has closed.

If I have bunions on both feet, can they both be removed at once?

Both can be done at the same time though it may be a better option to do one and then wait a couple of weeks before doing the other. This allows time for the body to heal and recuperate from the first surgery before doing the second.

How do I care for the incision after the surgery?

Generally, it is recommended to use a silicone gel to minimize appearance of scar tissue. Vitamin E cream and Mederma can also improve the cosmetic outcome of the surgery.

I have some back issues due to a car accident. Is this surgery still an option?

Bunion surgery is actually a good idea if you are experiencing back stress. You can stabilize the foot through surgery and that will in turn decrease any pressure on your back.

If you are looking for an expert opinion on whether or not bunion surgery is a good option, contact Bunion Surgery Los Angeles to book a consultation.